Discover the 9-to-5 career of a traveler

This post is not about my travels. It’s about the career of a traveler with a job. An engineer working in a startup in Paris, doing big data applied to Aviation.

In some of my previous posts I talk about the fact I could not give up on my job in order to become a full-time traveler. Now it’s time I present to you what exactly is my career about, where do I work and what are my contributions on the project.

The 9-to-5 career of a traveler with a job

The beginning

There had been some things going around in my life. Graduating engineering, moving out to a new country, starting a new life. I have been a little confused in the beginning and for about 6 months I had to deal with a job I didn’t actually wanted, but needed in order to survive.

My background

When I realized I was attracted by the field of aeronautics it was already too late. By the time I realized I would have preferred doing aeronautics engineering, I already graduated in automatics and computer science. And did some masters in signal processing and again automatics.

Testing the ejection seat of a Mirage F1

My first job

So once I finished with moving from a country to another, and after all my bac+6 studies, I ended up with a programmer job that made me hate my life and my background studies. But I realized I actually wanted to do aeronautics. I had an idea I could model the dynamics, find some equilibrium forces and apply automatics on some processes on aircrafts related problems, so I crafted my CV and my motivation letter to express these competences.

The struggle of finding the job I would actually enjoy

Soon I started applying for jobs in aeronautics field, like engine engineer, engine test and validation engineer and so on, for the big companies like Airbus and Safran.

I had some interviews with recruiters that knew little to nothing about aeronautics. I wanted some insights, but it didn’t work. With each interview I felt I was being pushed away little by little, because HR people weren’t what I had in mind. For instance, even if your profile was something they were searching for the job, if your salary expectation were too high, they wouldn’t recommend you for the technical interviews. The most important thing for me was to work in this field.

A museum inside an airplane? Yes, in Paris.

Landing THE job interview

And one day I receive a call for an interview with a startup in aeronautics.

The interview went smoothly and I could start right after the French summer holiday week which is in August. It was perfect for me. Any sooner I wasn’t available, because we had booked a mini trip to Italy for that period.

My dream job

At that time I had no idea what I was putting myself into, but went with the flow. Met the team of 10 (or 12 at that time), began to learn more about my job and the project I was assigned to… alone.

Now, almost 3 years later, my baby project is a grown-up, with its clients, partners, innovation laboratory, patents and more people working on developing it. I would have never thought that I could get where I am now when I first started.

Frankly, I had no idea.

My contributions at the job

My desk mascot

The advantage of working in a startup is that all the best ideas I proposed became a part of the project. But what is my project about? you would ask.

It’s about reducing fuel and CO2 emissions for aircrafts during the climb phase, by proposing an optimized profile that takes into account weather conditions, aircraft configuration, the scheduled route and the historic behaviour of the aircraft.

This means that I get to analyse a huge amount of data coming from black boxes, and propose an aerodynamic model for the aircraft. Long story short, I’m doing big data applied to aeronautics.

We have created partnerships with French institutions in order to propose even more solutions for reducing the fuel burnt, such as optimizing other sectors of the flight, like the cruise phase, proposing best practices based on regulations and historic behaviour, and so on.

Every day I get to imagine new ways of reducing the fuel burnt by airplanes. Each day I might come across something new to learn, constantly keeping busy in regard to this subject.

Pretty badass, right?


So that’s my excuse for not travelling full-time. Working in this field I feel more accomplished knowing that what I do from 9 to 5 has an impact on our plane tickets’ price, but more importantly, on our nature.

Let me hear about your job. Are you a digital nomad or 9-to-5 worker? Do you like your career? How does it impact your travels? Share with us in the comments!
French rocket, Arianne exposed at the Salon du Bourget, Paris 2015
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21 thoughts on “Discover the 9-to-5 career of a traveler”

  1. Awww! Thank you for contributing to my travels ? I’m a 9-to-5 worker unfortunately. I say that because I’d prefer to stimulate my mind and travel the world at the same time. I get bored easily and stale work isn’t fun. I, however, work in the field that I’ve been trying to get into for the past few years. I finally landed a position (temporary) last year after almost looking for two years. I travel for work. Domestically mostly, but it’s still travel. I always said that I wanted to see the US just as much as the rest of the world. Thanks for the article.

  2. Let me hear about your job. Are you a digital nomad or 9-to-5 worker? Do you like your career? How does it impact your travels? Share with us in the comments!

    Awww! Thank you for contributing to my travels 🙂 I’m a 9-to-5 worker unfortunately. I say that because I’d prefer to stimulate my mind and travel the world at the same time. I get bored easily and stale work isn’t fun. I, however, work in the field that I’ve been trying to get into for the past few years. I finally landed a position (temporary) last year after almost looking for two years. I travel for work. Domestically mostly, but it’s still travel. I always said that I wanted to see the US just as much as the rest of the world. Thanks for the article.

  3. Great post, your happiness shines through. It’s hard running a travel blog with a job and trying to fit a life in as well so well done! I’m pretty well set, I worked for a marketing company for two years before moving to Madrid, a small team of about 15. When I told them I was moving I offered my resignation. What was great is that because everything we do is online they kept me on so I still have a job and they now have a Madrid office (my bedroom). Some would say it was lucky but it was also down to working hard for two years so they wanted to keep me on rather than just saying “bye … good luck!” I don’t know what my point is but I enjoyed writing my little story!

  4. Rarely i have read stories where travelers are passionate about their 9-5 jobs and that is why i loved your blog. We can do both traveling and our job parallely without much fuss! good luck.

  5. You have such a brilliant job, a true example of following your dreams. If only everyone was able to do this. I am actually scared of flying and every time I do it (very often) I go through a million emotions and feelings. I like being in control, with my feet on the ground. 🙂

  6. That’s a really great project. I love travel but we can’t deny the impact it does to nature fuel-wise consumption, pollution and not to mention travelers who don’t respect the place and the culture of the place. You are doing an amazing job!

  7. Congratulations on finding and living your dream! There’s nothing more rewarding than doing what you love and loving what you do. It is not work for a paycheck anymore, it’s a daily adventure where you can’t wait to get up and go!

  8. I think its completely fine to have a job as well as travelling, I do, not everyone wants to hear about giving up everything to continuously travel. For a lot of people that isnt realistic so I dont think you need to have an excuse. I have a full time job as well as travel blogging, but I work for a travel company so I can combine the two. It’s rare to find something you enjoy so well done 🙂

    1. Thank you for your thoughtful comment, Stephanie!

      I was going through some phases and at some point I wanted to ragequit everything and go traveling. Then I became frustrated that there were people (bloggers) out there making a living from traveling, so I started brainstorming my options. Finally I came to realize I love my career (plus my hobbies, other than traveling), so the idea of traveling full time just became mainstream and unimportant for me.
      I’m glad you too have things sorted out!

      Cheers and safe travels!

  9. I understand the struggle with career because I have been through similar phases. Congratulations on finding something that you like to do. Congratulations on following your dream.

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